Clinton H. Blake

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Clinton Hamlin Blake

Clinton Hamlin Blake
Born Nov. 11, 1843
Brooklyn, NY
Died May 18th, 1947
Englewood, NJ
Nationality American
Alma mater Polytechnic Institute
Occupation Wholesale drygoods
Home town Englewood, NJ
Known for Political activism in Englewood
Spouse(s) Mary G. Parsons (1872)

Clinton Hamlin Blake is notable for having been a founding father of numerous Englewood institutions, and the father of Mayor Clinton Hamlin Blake, Jr.. [1]. He played a role too in the founding of Englewood Cliffs, and is women's rights issues... Englewood Cliffs' formation dates back to an election for Road Commissioner in Road District 1 between William Outis Allison and Clinton H. Blake, then a future mayor of Englewood. Blake won the vote, but Allison challenged the result, arguing that women had been improperly allowed to vote. The vote was overturned, but Englewood officials would not seat Allison, which ultimately led to his successful efforts in 1895 to have Road District 1 secede to form the Borough of Englewood Cliffs, with Allison serving as the new municipality's first mayor.[2] In 1890 he was an officer in the "Lyceum Company" which built a substantial building which housed a concert hall, and listed as tenants inter alia, the Englewood Club [3] Shortly thereafter the Englewood Library Association was formed and moved into the Lyceum building as well, and Blake was on its Board too [4]. And also the Citizen's National Bank rented the tower room, where PNC bank today stands, and Blake, as president of the Englewood Improvement Society arranged the tenancy. [5] Blake later served as one of the initial Presidents of the bank [5]. During the 1892 Cleveland-Harrison presidential campaign, Blake served as a Vice-President of the Cleveland Campaign Club (Republican). [5]. in 1893 there were elections for road commissioners, and women despite suffrage not having yet been won owned much land in their own names and turned out as voters. Blake was elected in the 1st district, edging out William O. Allison. [6]. Allison called the vote's legality into question, claiming that the women didn't have the right to vote, and went to Court. meanwhile the other commissioners elected Blake Chairman while the case drageged through the Courts. Much animosity was created, undoubtedly entering into the ultimate separation of Englewood Cliffs as an entity. In 1894 Blake was one of the signers of a petition appearing in the Englewood Press, which promoted the idea of incorporation as a City, and this resulted in its being placed on a ballot.

In 1902, when Daniel Currie was elected Mayor, L.E. Curtis was elected to Council for the 1st ward. Later he would be forced to resign due to ill health and Blake filled his seat by the election of the other members[7].

Sports matters

In 1881 Blake was listed as a member of the founding board of the Lawn Tennis and Archery Club, with grounds on Lydecker Street.[8]




References

  1. Sterling, Adleine (1922) (in English). The Book of Englewood. Mayor and Council of Englewood. p. Various. 
  2. Karcher, Alan J. New Jersey's Multiple Municipal Madness, p. 52. Rutgers University Press, 1998. ISBN 9780813525662. Accessed December 5, 2013.
  3. Sterling, Adleine (1922) (in English). The Book of Englewood. Mayor and Council of Englewood. p. 152. 
  4. Sterling, Adleine (1922) (in English). The Book of Englewood. Mayor and Council of Englewood. p. 153. 
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 Sterling, Adleine (1922) (in English). The Book of Englewood. Mayor and Council of Englewood. p. 153, 154. 
  6. Sterling, Adleine (1922) (in English). The Book of Englewood. Mayor and Council of Englewood. p. 161. 
  7. Sterling, Adleine (1922) (in English). The Book of Englewood. Mayor and Council of Englewood. p. 177. 
  8. Sterling, Adleine (1922) (in English). The Book of Englewood. Mayor and Council of Englewood. p. 124.